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Consumer Notice of Lead Tap Water Results

To put the results in perspective: 1 ppb is equal to 1 drop of ink in a  railroad tanker filled with Water or adding a pinch of salt to a 10-ton bag of potato chips or 1 second in 32  years. The table below identifies the locations and results of the samples collected.  

Location 

Date  

Collected

Result (ppb) 

Result ABOVE or BELOW 15 ppb Lead Action Level?

Office 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

Room 126 Sink 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

113B Fountain Hallway  Filler

3/2/2021 

3.4 

Below

RM 128 sink 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

RM 133 sink 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

RM 120 sink 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

New clinic Lab sink 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

Teachers Lounge 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

Room 139 Sink 

3/2/2021 

<0.5 

Below

Kitchen Prep sink sprayer 

3/2/2021 

0.7 

Below



What Does This Mean? 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set the action level for lead in drinking water at 0.015 mg/L.  The action level is the concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other  requirements which a water system must follow. The Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) is the level of  a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a  margin of safety. The EPA-set MCLG for lead is zero. <0.0005 is essentially zero. 

What Are the Health Effects of Lead? 

Lead can cause serious health problems if too much enters your body from drinking water or other  sources. It can cause damage to the brain and kidneys and can interfere with the production of red blood  cells that carry oxygen to all parts of your body. The greatest risk of lead exposure is to infants, young  children, and pregnant women. Scientists have linked the effects of lead on the brain with lowered IQ in  children. Adults with kidney problems and high blood pressure can be affected by low levels of lead more  than healthy adults. Lead is stored in the bones, and it can be released later in life. During pregnancy,  the child receives lead from the mother's bones, which may affect brain development. What Can I Do toReduce Exposure to Lead in Drinking Water? 

  1. Run your water to flush out lead. If it has not been used for several hours, run the cold water tap  until the temperature is noticeably colder. This flushes lead-containing water from the pipes. To  conserve water, remember to catch the flushed tap water for plants or some other household use (e.g.  cleaning). 
  2. Always use cold water for drinking, cooking, and preparing baby formula. Never cook with or drink water from the hot water tap. Never use water from the hot water tap to make formula. 3. Do not boil water to remove lead. Boiling water will not reduce lead. 
  3. You may consider investing in a home water treatment device or alternative water source. When  purchasing a water treatment device, make sure it is certified under Standard 53 by NSF International  to remove lead. Contact NSF at 1-800-NSF-8010 or visit www.nsf.org. You may also visit the Water  Quality Association’s website at www.wqa.org
5. Get your child's blood tested. Contact your local health department or healthcare provider to find  out how you can get your child tested for lead if you are concerned about exposure.
 
 
 

Durango 9-R Florida Mesa Elementary PWSID: CO0234380 

For more information about this notice please contact: Deb Hall, Water Operator at 970-769-2695 Or Bill Wilson, Facilities Coordinator for Durango 9-R at 970-247-5411 ext. 1458